EU Fails the Young Unemployed

Scottish voters narrowly said no to independence. This was the better outcome: an independent Scotland governed by the Scottish National Party and Labour would have build a full-fledged Scandinavian welfare state, paid for in good part with revenue from oil taxes. It would have been a bad deal for the Scottish people, especially since they were apparently planning on staying part of the EU.

By remaining part of the United Kingdom the Scotsmen will be better off the day Britain leaves the EU. British taxes are still at the lower end in Europe, its welfare state is not quite as elaborate as in, e.g., Scandinavia and there is still a tradition of individual responsibility and opportunity left there. By seceding from the EU, Britain would have a future at least as bright as that which lies ahead for the United States once we are through this laggard recovery and back in full gear again.

In fact, the list of reasons for member states to leave the EU grows longer almost by the day. The latest addition is the so called “youth guarantee”, a feeble and typically statist idea to reduce youth unemployment. From the EU Observer:

Outgoing EU commissioner for employment Laszlo Andor on Wednesday (17 September) defended EU-wide efforts to tackle youth unemployment amid critical remarks from MEPs. Andor told deputies that the so-called youth guarantee “is well on track and is already bringing results”. He noted many of the programmes in the policy are set for adoption this year. He also said national authorities expected to send the commission “concrete information” by the end of the month on the estimated number of young people who stand to benefit. Submitting and getting the commission to adopt operational programmes is important because it entitles member states access to EU funding.

This is a good summary of what the “youth guarantee” is all about. The EU taxes its citizens (visa member states) then spends the money on putting young men and women on subsidized employment. Employers get cheap labor that they could not afford without the subsidy – and cannot afford when the subsidy ends – while government can formally count the tax-sponsored “employees” as no longer unemployed.

This is a classic example of “active labor market policy”, ALMP. Like most other bad economic ideas it has its roots in Sweden, which by the way at 27.6 percent has the eighth highest rate of youth unemployment in the EU (according to Eurostat, second quarter 2014).

The EU Observer again:

So far only France and Italy fit the description. Launched last year, the guarantee is the EU’s response to persistent record high unemployment rates among the under-25s. It aims to find young people work or training within four months after graduation or after being laid off. “In principle the youth guarantee is a very positive thing for young people, but national leaders lack the political will and ambition to properly implement it,” Allan Pall, secretary general of the Brussels-based European Youth Forum, told this website.

Of course they do. The EU has created this and expects that member states share the cost for it. First Brussels strong-arms member states into jobs-destroying austerity programs – thus saving the welfare state at the expense of full employment – then Brussels comes back and tries to mandate that those same member states spend money on artificial, tax-subsidized employment for the young men and women who could not find jobs because of austerity.

Back to the EU Observer:

Meanwhile, the jobless trend remains stubborn with one in two youths still unable to land a job in either Greece or in Spain. Spain (53.8% in July 2014) now has the highest youth unemployment numbers, overtaking cash-strapped Greece (53.1% in May 2014). Italy, Croatia, Portugal, and Cyprus are not far behind. Overall EU numbers indicate that more than one in five young people still cannot find a job.

Here are the numbers from Eurostat for the EU states that so far have reported youth unemployment for the second quarter of 2014:

2014Q2
Spain 53.1
Greece 52.7
Italy 41.5
Croatia 39.8
Portugal 35.6
Cyprus 35.2
Slovakia 30.9
Sweden 27.6
Ireland 26.8
Finland 25.6
Belgium 23.1
Poland 23.1
Slovenia 22.3
Bulgaria 21.9
France 21.5
Lithuania 21.3
Latvia 21.1
Hungary 20.0
Estonia 18.4
Britain 16.0
Czech Rep. 15.5
Malta 12.4
Denmark 12.3
Luxembourg 12.0
Netherlands 10.6
Germany 7.9

It is worth noting that the Greek unemployment rate has fallen almost ten percentage points in two years. A good part of the reason, though, is that young Greeks emigrate, even to such formerly deplorable economies as Romania.

Overall, the youth unemployment rate in EU-28 is 21.7 percent and 22.9 for the 18-state euro zone. By comparison, America’s youth unemployment rate has fallen to 13.5 percent, down 3.1 percentage points in a year. That is twice the reduction in the EU-28. But more importantly, of the 26 reporting EU states, seven saw youth unemployment rise in the past year, and that includes Germany. The Netherlands reported unchanged unemployment since second quarter 2013 and only eight states reported a decline bigger than that in the United States.

To further highlight the lack of an EU-wide trend of declining youth unemployment, please note that almost one in three young men and women who went from unemployment in Q2 of 2013 to a job in Q2 of 2014 lived in Britain. In Q2 of 2013 Britain was home to only 9.3 percent of all the unemployed youth in the EU, a fact that reinforces the point that Britain, with its strong currency, moderate taxes and Anglo-Saxian economic and social traditions, does not belong in the European Union. It belongs in a trans-Altantic relationship with its culturally proximate friends in North America.

As for the rest of the EU member states, they would be well advised to develop an orderly plan for dissolving the super-state structure before Marine Le Pen becomes the next French president and destroys the euro by reintroducing the franc.

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